Reminders

  
Facebook’s new(ish) Timehop like features are so great. Today, it pulled up a note I published on FB six years ago. It’s a quote from Mother Teresa. 

So wise. 

Speaking of notes, I wonder what happened to that feature. I haven’t published one in years and haven’t seen anyone else publish either. 

So it goes…

Ode to The West Wing, Aaron Sorkin

It’s not about abortion. It’s about the next 20 years. Twenties and thirties, it was the role of government. Fifties and sixties, it was civil rights. The next two decades, it’s gonna be privacy. I’m talking about the Internet. I’m talking about cellphones. I’m talking about health records, and who’s gay and who’s not. And moreover, in a country born on a will to be free, what could be more fundamental than this?

— Sam Seaborn in The West Wing, Season 1, Episode 9. Air date: 11/24/1999

I’m re-watching “The West Wing” again, letting it run in the background in lieu of music. No matter how many times I watch the series — at least three times a year for about six years in a row now — I am blow away by the super sharp, clever dialogue.

The quote up top is only one of the many reasons why “The West Wing” is still my favorite series on television – hands down. Think about it. In 1999, the public was still heavily reliant on pagers. The internet was only used by ‘nerds’ and ‘weirdos’. Dial-up was the norm. Aol was slowly being discovered by teens. Sorkin was way ahead of his time for someone writing for television.

If you haven’t seen the series, it is highly recommended. I may also be biased, as that particular quote by Sam, reminds me how fortunate I am to have lived through one of the most spectacular eras: the shift from analog (vinyls, cassette tapes) to digital. Rise of hardware, software, cloud and back to hardware (wearables). The mobile revolution (pagers to flip phones to smartphones) — I mean, I can go on and on. Every time I think of all that I have seen and experienced, I cannot help but to be grateful.

Thank you, mom and dad!

Digital Expectations

She sucks.” he said. “Just because she has different email habits than you and me, it doesn’t means ‘she sucks’.” I immediately wrote back.

The other day I hooked a friend up with a friend of a friend for a ‘friend’s and family’ AirBnB discount. My friend looking for the AirBnB isn’t online 24/7 but for hyper connected people, one day of unresponsiveness seems like a week. My friend hooking my other friend up with the AirBnB sent a borderline hostile email threatening to cancel the verbal reservation if she doesn’t respond within x number of hours. The whole thing was a bit stressful for all parties involved and unnecessarily dramatic.

But then I thought about it and realized I am guilty of acting like him too. That when I send an email, I expect a response within a day. Which got me wondering: “Do digital people expect too much from others who have different behaviors than us? Do I cause unnecessary drama, stress and negativity because of those expectations?”

I don’t know if there is one answer but the biggest takeaway I got from this interaction is the world isn’t going to end because someone doesn’t immediately respond. Be more empathetic. Lay off expectations. Ease up a bit. Not just for myself but to be better towards others and, to the world.

Learn something new everyday.

Update

I’ve been getting inquiries on what I’m up to and I guess I should share here, too. Without going into too much detail, I’m pursuing a passion and figured out a way to make money from doing what I love. In short, it involves food.

Don’t get me wrong. I still love everything about the internet and technology. I’m just focusing more on myself. I started 2015 with a plan and working daily to meet milestones.

If interested, I’m blogging over on my other site. Though heads-up, if you’re not keen on food (dining, recipes, food related nerdy posts, etc.) then you shouldn’t bother clicking ;) Once I launch what I’m working on, I will for sure update here, too.

Until then, see you on OtherBits!

Beautiful People, Ugly Site. Oh, the Irony

I got sucked into signing up for a lame site / app. It’s apparently the ‘new Tinder’ but a more selective version, as people of the opposite sex need to vote you in to become a member.

So I log-in, create an account and am immediately judged by the opposite sex.

B_qfVIxUIAALZ3X

 

The first thing I notice? How dare an app that’s not even optimized for the iPhone 6/6+ judge me. The app’s text is so massive it looks like an old person phone where the font is blown-up so large, one text message hogs the entire screen.

The more I think about it, the stupider this app seems so I delete it from my phone. Not even 10 seconds later I get an email notification: “Someone is checking out your profile.”

Um what? Deleting the app doesn’t delete my profile? Great.

So I log onto their website and…

Online_Dating_Sites__Internet_Dating_Websites_-_BeautifulPeople_com

Holy 1999. This service just took some button .gif off stock images or something, didn’t even bother cropping it. Even kids on MySpace had better graphics than that up there on their clunky HTML pages. Jesus. And don’t even get me started on the font.

Maybe it’s just me but for a service to brand themselves as ‘exclusive’, their attention to detail – or lack thereof – is quite shameful. I’m embarrassed for them and hope this service burns to the ground.

What a crock of shit.

End of an era: RIP TokyoFinds

About_Me_|_TokyoFinds

 

I started TokyoFinds when I first moved to Japan and within several months it was doing well. Posts were getting picked up by major blogs (Bored Panda, Buzzfeed, etc.) and a lot of my friends in the US loved it.

Well. My login and password were saved in my phone and browser, so I hadn’t manually logged-in for over a year. When I switched phones, it set off some security trigger and prompted punching in email and password manually on both browser and app. Lo and behold I have zero clue what the log-in and password is.

I’ve been trying to ask Tumblr for help but they’re basically useless. So I’m closing that chapter of my internet life. (I’m blogging about Japan more in-depth here, if anyone’s interested.)

So long, farewell, see-ya TokyoFinds!
And good riddance. I never look back darling, I live for the now. ;)