Crypto News for The Rest of Us

Big week in cryptocurrencies, decided to do a round-up for non-technical people. Enjoy.

ICOs and Regulations

Just in 2017, ICOs have raised $2.7B and 18 have raised more than $100M, while 120 have raised up to $50M. In the past five months, ICOs have raised more than $350M each. To put that in context, ICOs raised 32% as much as Series A startups in the last quarter alone. link

ICOs are hot, hot, hot, but … what about regulations?

During Singapore’s FinTech Festival, the Singapore government revealed their new ICO regulations. Unlike China, Hong Kong, Vietnam and South Korea that outright banned ICOs, Singapore’s central bank: the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) published a document to clarify SG’s ICO standards. 12

Meanwhile Japan, the US and EU are still in ‘discussion’ mode with the SEC issuing warnings, sending alarm bells to those looking to jump on the ICO train. 12 (There was even a discussion of ICO purchases being entitled to a refund by law? America is so adorable.)

Reading through the Monetary Authority of Singapore’s 13 page document, the terms are a bit fluffy and serves more as a guide than regulations of what specifically defines as an ICO. Lots of loopholes and workarounds are still possible but the report’s objective is to prevent scams and “combating money laundering and terrorism financing”. (Sure, good luck with that. But how about understanding the technology first, before layering rules?)

What you need to know about SG’s definitions of when ICOs are or aren’t securities:

  • ICO trading platforms require vetting and a license issued by MAS
  • some digital currency issued during ICO campaigns (or what are called ‘shit coins’ — alt coins aside from the well known ones like Bitcoin BTC, Bitcoin Cash BTH, Ethereum ETH — that are super minor) may possess characteristics of ‘normal’ currency and must publish a regulation-compliant investment prospectus and register it with the central bank.
  • there are exceptions to the rule including: if the ICO does not exceed S$5M within a 12 month period, offer is made to institutional investors only, and the offer is made to accredited investors under SG’s prescribed investor class.

These discussions of regulations by the big guys is an indicator of normalizing cryptocurrency, but I can’t help but think of how the promise of cryptocurrency are how 1. transactions happen collaboratively 2. secure because they are backed by technology and 3. without central points telling people what to do and how to do it (and without all the fees).

In other crypto news:

Notable Partnerships, Movements in Regulatory Systems, Alliances

  • AMEX announces partnership with Ripple, a crypto payment’s platform
  • MasterCard finally jumps on the blockchain payment bandwagon filing a patent in the U.S. for their platform link
  • KPMG joins the Wall Street Blockchain Alliance — a 501(c)(6) non-profit trade association. link
  • 20 global banks and financial institutions join Singapore and Hong Kong’s blockchain based network — no clear indicators of the implications yet link

Products and Services

  • VISA in partnership with the blockchain startup Chain, rolled out B2B blockchain payments. VISA is already partnered with U.S.-based Commerce Bank, South Korea’s Shinhan Bank, the Union Bank of Philippines and the United Overseas Bank, based in Singapore. link
  • Square’s Cash app is testing a feature to buy and sell bitcoin (only for U.S. users) link

Reports for PowerPoints

  • Deloitte scoured GitHub and published a report from the data so we don’t have to. The report is long and nerdy but there are some handy charts on there in case any of you MBAs need it for a PowerPoint 🤗 Find the report here.

PS: I’m playing around with a newsletter, not ready to announce yet but you can sign up here: https://tinyletter.com/highinnovationAny and all feedback, questions, and thoughts are welcome — simply reply to the newsletter or tweet me. Big shout-out to Jeff H., Jon Russell,Daryl S., and Dave McClure for invaluable insights and help.

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Why Bitcoin is Important

Most have now heard of Bitcoin because there is so much coverage of people getting ‘rich’ from Bitcoin. But the more I research, the more I realize: Not that many people know exactly what it is, how it applies to them, and why ‘Bitcoin’ is so valuable.

I put Bitcoin in quotes because Bitcoin only represents a sliver of the possibilities behind the fundamental reason Bitcoin, or cryptocurrency, digital assets, alt coins, and blockchain are so important. That said, disclaimer: If you’re here to learn how to instantly make money from ICOs, this post isn’t for you.

Let me back up a bit.

The rapid growth of the middle-class is the reason I choose to live in SEA but it also should be worrisome to the world for one reason: by 2030, it is projected that 2/3 of the world’s middle class population will be living in Asia. I use the term Asia broadly, but these countries include, but not limited to: Asia-Pacific (Southeast Asia ie: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, Philippines, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Brunei), and of course, China, and India. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

What this implies is if 2/3 of the middle class population is based in Asia, the economic power will start shifting, new problems and solutions for these problems come alive. Or, as we commonly hear: disruption and innovation.

My interest in Bitcoin (or crypotcurrency and blockchain technology) simply started as a curious, technologically savvy person residing in this region, as crypoto is only one of the ‘disruptive’ or ‘innovative’ technologies deriving from quick change. Within the short 4.5 years I’ve moved from the States to ‘Asia’, I’ve seen with my own eyes, massive advances.

What does this mean?

I’ve been obsessed with messaging apps, anything mobile, and SEA — specifically how technology is changing economies in high-growth nations, driving innovation from need, reducing socio-economic inequalities, and the failures of first world nations to keep up. (This sounds like a bunch of jargon but whatever. Deal with it.)

Messaging apps that started as communication utilities are now full-blown ecosystems where billions of micro-transactions from communication (messaging), payments (cashless), to things that make daily life easier (food delivery, share economy, etc.) take place on a daily basis. And this is just the beginning.

In a region where things change on close to a daily basis, conversations about currency are naturally floating about because

  1. according to the World Bank’s Global Financial Inclusion Database, over 2.5B adults in developing economies do not own bank accounts
  2. and only 20% of those living in extreme poverty own bank accounts

Source

And by 2020, there will be 1 billion new smartphone subscribers only in SEA. (source)

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With the mobile penetration changes, our daily lives are impacted, as daily necessities are physically met through mobile technology. If you live in a first world, it may be hard to imagine a world where getting from point A to point B can take an entire day, since city infrastructures in developing nations aren’t designed to handle traffic and congestion. Imagine taking a day off to run simple errands, such as shopping, banking, and paying bills. Now, imagine not having a bank account because you can’t afford to pay banking fees or you don’t have a valid I.D., or worse: the nearest bank to your home requires a day trip.

Enter Bitcoin.

In regions with pain points such as the above, the notion of currency that doesn’t require the middleman (banks) is the reason investors, bankers, and smart people in fin-tech find Bitcoin so alluring.

Put it this way: If we can make free calls between San Francisco and Beijing, why do we have to pay to transfer money from San Francisco to Beijing? If it takes all day to take out cash from my bank account, why won’t I leave it in a safe under my bed unless there’s a better option? In a world where middlemen can potentially take six paychecks worth of fees, why wouldn’t I find a way to cut out the middleman and directly transact?

These are only a few problems ‘Bitcoin’ or more accurately, cryptocurrency and blockchain technology can solve.

Stay tuned for Part II: An Explanation of Blockchain for Non-Tech People
Edit: published! You can read it here.

Why Are We Still Carrying Wallets in 2017?

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The food court inside one of the biggest malls in Bangkok — Paragon — has digital menu boards and is cashless. This food court in this ‘third world country’ Bangkok is more advanced than Japan or America. This digitization not just aesthetically pleasing, it actually works and here is why:

  • efficient — because cash is not exchanged, there is barely a line and even the most popular spots the transaction is really fast
  • effective for SMBs — zero cash transactions with profit reconciliation at end of day, the number of mistakes are limited to erroneous input vs erroneous input + too little/less change

In Bangkok, the public transportation system is called BTS. And each BTS station also have similar methods where all the tiny stalls take zero cash and only these pre-paid cards.

How does a developing nation figure it out before the rest of the first world???

iPhone in Jakarta starring Reza

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One of my favorite things to do while traveling is talk to locals. This is Reza. He is 22 years old from Solo, a region in the Central Java region of Indonesia. Java, by the way, is stunning. Google the images and prepare for your minds to be blown. But I digress.

Reza moved to Jakarta for university, and attends school during the day, works in a restaurant until midnight every day. He has been saving for an iPhone and is planning to purchase one some time soon. Not the 6. Not the 5s even. He is excited for the iPhone 5. Right now, I don’t even know the kind of phone he has.

I didn’t want to ask him how much he makes, but according to Salary Explorer, average restaurant worker salary in Jakarta is 7,400,000 IDR a month (appx: $600 USD).

Reza is only one of the many people I have talked with, to further understand the Indonesian — well Jakartan — market.

We all know the population is high. The GDP is through the roof. I’ve questioned people’s excitement about Indonesia in the past, but after experiencing Jakarta, I must admit, I am now a believer in this market too.

Indonesian people rapidly adapt to new technologies and have a willingness to learn — even, if they cannot currently afford to own devices and such to get them online or make their day to days easier with technology. I am thrilled to be here and look forward to sharing more on the ground stories of Indonesia.

Only a few reasons I love emerging markets

During conversations with one of my favorite VCs and separately, with one of my favorite tech bloggers, services I never heard of were brought up. I also learned a few things I’m just going to leave here — more like a note to self — before I forget.

Old age, the struggle is real.


 

Opera still has 300M MUAs.
Opera Mini (the mobile browser
– Indian users of the Opera Mini mobile browsers used 75% less mobile data in the first half of the year
– is compatible with over 3,000 mobile devices, dumb phones and smartphones
-works on basic Java to the latest Android and iOS platforms

Wow – who knew. It’s such a perfect browser for emerging nations where cost and access are barriers source


 

Random thought: I wish I was passionate about logistics. So much money and room for disruption there. Imagine “between x and y is z” (where x, y = time and z = service ex: delivery, internet, cable, food, etc) is non existent. Time is precise. Or in plain English, parcels will be dropped off and service rendered at exact times.

The solution would involve an algo that calculates most cost efficient delivery radius in a way that’s never been done before. Combine that with a notification app like Yo, that’s a billion dollar business right there. And I believe the solution will come out of Asia.


 

Binu Screenshot_9_15_14_9_26_PM

Which reminded me of Frontline SMS Screenshot_9_15_14_9_28_PM

 

Google APAC has WiFi enabled rickshaws to help people go online

*Pardon the lazy post