Why Bitcoin is Important

Most have now heard of Bitcoin because there is so much coverage of people getting ‘rich’ from Bitcoin. But the more I research, the more I realize: Not that many people know exactly what it is, how it applies to them, and why ‘Bitcoin’ is so valuable.

I put Bitcoin in quotes because Bitcoin only represents a sliver of the possibilities behind the fundamental reason Bitcoin, or cryptocurrency, digital assets, alt coins, and blockchain are so important. That said, disclaimer: If you’re here to learn how to instantly make money from ICOs, this post isn’t for you.

Let me back up a bit.

The rapid growth of the middle-class is the reason I choose to live in SEA but it also should be worrisome to the world for one reason: by 2030, it is projected that 2/3 of the world’s middle class population will be living in Asia.

I use the term Asia broadly, but these countries include, but not limited to: Asia-Pacific (Southeast Asia ie: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, Philippines, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Brunei), and of course, China, and India. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

What this implies is if 2/3 of the middle class population is based in Asia, the economic power will start shifting, new problems and solutions for these problems come alive. Or, as we commonly hear: disruption and innovation.

My interest in Bitcoin (or crypotcurrency and blockchain technology) simply started as a curious, technologically savvy person residing in this region, as crypoto is only one of the ‘disruptive’ or ‘innovative’ technologies deriving from quick change. Within the short 4.5 years I’ve moved from the States to ‘Asia’, I’ve seen with my own eyes, massive advances.

What does this mean?

I’ve been obsessed with messaging apps, anything mobile, and SEA — specifically how technology is changing economies in high-growth nations, driving innovation from need, reducing socio-economic inequalities, and the failures of first world nations to keep up. (This sounds like a bunch of jargon but whatever. Deal with it.)

Messaging apps that started as communication utilities are now full-blown ecosystems where billions of micro-transactions from communication (messaging), payments (cashless), to things that make daily life easier (food delivery, share economy, etc.) take place on a daily basis. And this is just the beginning.

In a region where things change on close to a daily basis, conversations about currency are naturally floating about because

  1. according to the World Bank’s Global Financial Inclusion Database, over 2.5B adults in developing economies do not own bank accounts
  2. and only 20% of those living in extreme poverty own bank accounts

Source

And by 2020, there will be 1 billion new smartphone subscribers only in SEA. (source)

With the mobile penetration changes, our daily lives are impacted, as daily necessities are physically met through mobile technology. If you live in a first world, it may be hard to imagine a world where getting from point A to point B can take an entire day, since city infrastructures in developing nations aren’t designed to handle traffic and congestion. Imagine taking a day off to run simple errands, such as shopping, banking, and paying bills. Now, imagine not having a bank account because you can’t afford to pay banking fees or you don’t have a valid I.D., or worse: the nearest bank to your home requires a day trip.

Enter Bitcoin.

In regions with pain points such as the above, the notion of currency that doesn’t require the middleman (banks) is the reason investors, bankers, and smart people in fin-tech find Bitcoin so alluring.

Put it this way: If we can make free calls between San Francisco and Beijing, why do we have to pay to transfer money from San Francisco to Beijing? If it takes all day to take out cash from my bank account, why won’t I leave it in a safe under my bed unless there’s a better option? In a world where middlemen can potentially take six paychecks worth of fees, why wouldn’t I find a way to cut out the middleman and directly transact?

These are only a few problems ‘Bitcoin’ or more accurately, cryptocurrency and blockchain technology can solve. 

Do note, these are examples in high-growth nations to simply illustrate the promise of cryptocurrency, but there are a ton of first-world scenarios where the blockchain can innovate and disrupt that I’m looking to share in the upcoming months.

In the meantime, hope this post clarified what the fuss about Bitcoin is about.

Stay tuned for Part II: An Explanation of Blockchain for Non-Tech People
Edit: published! You can read it here.

Internet Power Balance Shift to Asia

P1-BR340_AINTER_G_20140916174816

The WSJ had a nice piece breaking down the mega internet companies of the world — of course US leads the pack but Asian companies aren’t doing so shabby either. China is of course leading the ‘Asia’ pack due to sheer population volume. Seriously, file that under no shit Sherlock.

But there were some fun factoids:

  • 45% of the world’s nearly 3 billion internet users are in Asia
  • WeChat (owned by Tencent) has about 440m users
  • Tencent’s profit margin in the second quarter was 32%, compared with 27% at Facebook and 21% at Google.
  • Tencent’s stock-market value is $148 billion, compared with Facebook’s $194 billion.
  • LINE (Japanese messaging app) had revenue of $323 million, 16 times the estimated revenue of WhatsApp.

…separately, it’s really funny how ‘tech journalists’ don’t seem to understand the products they are writing about. This particular author, said WeChat is WhatsApp’s rival. No. No. No. I can not say this enough times: they are two very different products. WhatsApp is a communication utility – a tool. WeChat is a full fledged platform, an ecosystem.

The author also calls LINE stickers ‘cutesy emoticons’ — which further highlights the lack of understanding of mobile behavior in Asia even after NYT wrote about it!! (Pretty embarrassing).

Oh well. I guess that’s why there is a need for someone like me or Jon Russell of TNW and a dedicated publication like TIA to pipe on about this region.

The Magic of Silicon Valley

“The magic of Silicon Valley is the shared belief system that some will succeed. Carry the flame.” – Dave McClure

I wrote a guest post for The Next Web the other day and thought I’d share here, too. I love that quote by Dave McClure, who is such an inspiration to those outside of the Valley. He is one of, if not the only VC who actually takes the time to jump on a plane and show-up to tech ecosystems around the planet. His efforts are tireless and what he is doing for the global entrepreneurial community is something nobody can put a price on.

For those living in the US, it may be hard to picture, but a majority of the world is a bit behind when it comes to technology and startup cultures. Just imagine the way Silicon Valley was around 2005-06ish — the ripples of the second dot com boom were just forming. Facebook and Twitter were just starting out. Entrepreneurs were building products and webapps — software — because the smartphone penetration would come a year or two after that. There was activity, but the space wasn’t as crowded as it is today. VCs and founders, influential tech bloggers and reporters were more accessible… that’s how I see a lot of regions right now, in 2014.

APAC, especially Southeast Asia, is really exciting right now. And Dave McClure is ON IT. If you’ve never heard him talk abroad, you should YouTube it. He repeats over and over how Silicon Valley is a spirit. A confidence. A mindset.  A belief… and continues to motivate entrepreneurs around the globe. I really wish other high profile VCs took the time to do what he does, to. Not just for themselves (investing) but for technological advancement around the world.

Anyway. My TNW post is here: “Startup founders in Southeast Asia: it’s time to step up
The Red Herring also picked it up too: “Southeast Asia tech sees boost from emerging nations

SEAsia Messaging App Share

BqieJL4CQAAmH-o

 

LOTS of opportunities in SEAsia.
To recap on LINE:

  • 60% of LINE’s revenue came from the mobile games
  • LINE was the world’s top app publisher by monthly revenue
  • LINE Posts $143 Million In Revenue, Up 123% Year-Over-Year
  • $1.5mm USD revenue for user generated sticker marketplace

Granted, we may not see the same sorts of revenues from SEAsian countries, as most are developing nations and notorious for not spending (ex Path is Indonesia’s largest market, yet they never boast revenues or lack thereof).

The next few years will be fun to watch as chat apps mature and become more dominant.
(Sources 1,2,3, image via here)

 

Charts: Global Internet usage

I had to blog this vs tweeting  — it’s just too good not to share.
Take a look:

share-of-population-that-has-never-used-the-internet-2013_chartbuilder

  • 20% of Europeans have never used the Internet.
  • 34% of Italians have never used the Internet — via qz

Granted, there are still 13% of American adults in 2014 don’t use the Internet [1] but these numbers still astound me.

Then there is Asia — and I loathe using ‘Asia’ so loosely because Asia is BIG — but they are the global leader in online growth: 42% APAC vs 27% Europe — Comscore Asia forecast (PDF)

This is also a good opportunity to revisit the scope of technological adoption and revenues coming out of Asia.
Parallel with online growth; the increase of mobile traffic, combined with mobile revenues makes this region, the most interesting when it comes to disruptive technologies + monetization.

ChartOfTheDay_1088_Percentage_of_global_page_views_from_mobile_devices_n

 

Asia includes the following four countries: China, India, Japan and South Korea. Those four countries account for 66% of Asia’s population, 60% of Asia’s mobile connections and over 70% of regional mobile income. Four markets, four countries with four very different ecosystems.

China = population of 1.4 billion people, GDP of 8.2 trillion USD
India = population of 1.2 billion people, GDP of 1.84 trillion USD
South Korea = population of 50M people, GDP of 1.13 trillion USD
Japan = population of 127.6M people, GDP of 5.96 trillion USD

Then, there are the smaller countries with high GDPs and/or high population like: Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, etc., etc.

To put that into perspective, the US has a population of 314M people (double Japan) with a GDP of 15.68 trillion USD. Compared to the big four Asian countries (Japan, South Korea, India and China), the US has been ahead of the race as far as development, access and economic distribution. This development gap the US has, is significantly wider with India and China than the gap the US has with Japan and South Korea, but the US is still ahead of these four countries.

WSJ just reported China is projected to overtake the US in mobile revenue [2] but as I said here, Japan should be the market to pay attention to, as

  1. smartphone penetration is still low
  2. spend is high — and keeps growing

Looking at global run rates and stats, it’s all about Asia and realistically, which markets and ecosystems one can penetrate.

 

 

 

Japan App Store Rapid Growth

Startling facts:

  • Japan app store is expanding faster than expected, especially for apps outside the top 3-5.
  • by Mar 2015, a #10 ranked game will earn ¥1.7bn/m, which is the same as #2 earned in Nov 2013

 

State of mobile in Japan:

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 4.13.16 PM

 

 

  • Japan has 10x the USA’s population density, used to spending with carrier (payment) settlement since the 90’s (with iMode)
  • over 30% of households are one-person == spend more on entertainment vs family

Innovation has come to a halt in Japan and indeed on the surface it may seem that way as Japan has always been known for their hardware: Sony and Nintendo the two leaders at the helm.

However the Japanese people are still spending and looking to spend. They are the users and ultimately, paying customers, even if Japanese companies like Sony and Nintendo fail to deliver ‘innovation’.

Isn’t spend more important than who or what is actually delivering?

When I see figures like these:

non-Japanese companies listed in Japan
1991 = 127
2014 =  21

I can’t help but to be baffled. I get the allure of the BRIC countries but China and India are such unique markets with distinct ecosystems. Why wouldn’t a company want to come to a country with consumers who are looking to spend?

One thing is for sure — like I keep repeating — the world is not going to know what hit them when Japan’s smartphone market finally matures and the numbers that will come out of this country will blow people’s minds.

There is still massive opportunity in this country and one of the biggest reasons I am here.

*above from Japan/Korea Market and Japan App Store Macquarie Research reports unavailable to public.
Listed companies in Japan via The FT

Popular Communication & Messaging Apps by Country

I spent the past week reading forecasts and reports from Goldman Sachs, McKinsey, Morgan Stanley, Deutsche, etc., etc.

It sounds a bit boring but really not. It was actually fun to read, consume, compare and contrast the different reports.

Quick takeaways:

Deutsche Engagement

Deutsche’s chart of messaging apps used in Brazil, Russia, China, South Korea, Japan and the US.

culture and distro

 

Cross referenced with AppAnnie’s spend by country chart tells us:

  • S. Korea consumes and spends on content. Kakao Talk’s success is likely due to that ecosystem.
  • Japan leads in gaming, explaining the success of gaming companies as Capcom, DeNA, Gree, et al., and the reason the Japanese spend the most in both Google Play and iOS stores. Also explains success of LINE
  • US has wide range of content spend but the US is a distinct market from the rest of the world with different economical factors.

This chart also from App Annie interests me more, as it shows spend vs device:

Device per spend

I agree with Goldman Sachs, stating BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India and China) are 3-5 years away from global scaling and spending.

South Korea, with the highest spend and technological advancements, is like China where the ecosystems are so tightly intertwined it’s a tough market to penetrate. Fun to watch, but just like China, certain models and strategies cannot be emulated because of the reliance on proprietary strong holds.

For people looking to enter markets, Japan, UK and US are the likely bets. Or at least if I were a VC, that’s where I’d be placing bets.

Still digesting but as my thoughts parse, I will be sharing.

WeChat 101- Quit Comparing WeChat and WhatsApp

WhatsApp, Viber, Telegram and Snapchat are not like WeChat, LINE and KakaoTalk.

I’ve written about LINE and KakaoTalk but now it’s time to intro the last player – WeChat. WeChat is not – I repeat NOT anything like WhatsApp or Viber.

Aside from multi-media communication capabilities: photos, video, walkie-talkie and broadcast features, in August of 2013, WeChat completely overhauled their product with v5.1 to add a bunch of new features and functions.

They keep differentiating themselves from the rest of the chat apps and this is why:

  • in-app payments
  • P2P (peer to peer) and O2O (offline-online) core strategy aside from games <– HUGE
  • multiple monetization streams

Payments

WeChat-2

WeChat Payments connects bank card to WeChat account so users can make payments in-app.
Users can make transactions happen through 1. payments to WeChat authorized partner retailers 2. P2P (peer to peer) or in plain English other WeChat users – example: users can send one person a specified amount, or send money to a group and divide the lump sum among a group of friends.  If I had a penny for every time I’ve had issues with group payments where one person pays too much, too little I’d have about four extra iPhones sitting around. Or think about that one person who never has cash, etc., etc. WeChat group payments is the perfect resolution for group events / activities.

O2O / P2P Commerce

WeChat also partnered with sites and services – whether through acquisitions or buying a stake in the company – doing flash sales or becoming the preferred payment partner. To date, DianPing – China’s answer to Yelp, with a Groupon type group buying feature DianPing also offers coupons and discounts and users can even order food for delivery – is one of the most notable.

The other is Didi Dache – China’s Uber – where users can order a taxi and make payments, all in-app. Since forming the partnership in Jan., WeChat reports

  • 21mm cab rides have been booked via WeChat
  • 700k daily bookings via WeChat
  • Didi Dache and WeChat also pay cab drivers bonuses when the drivers use their services vs a competitor

WeChat also aggressively positions themselves as the entry point for global brands who want to reach China’s youths. Most recently, Vivienne Tam and WeChat collaborated to bring NYFW (NY Fashion Week) to WeChat users.

They’ve also done campaigns with Mc Donald’s, Starbucks, Burberry, Pepsi and Maybelline – bottom line, they are making money becoming a payment solution and by advertising as well.

Another monetization channel through partnerships is content. WeChat and Chinese media outlets bring news and entertainment to users. However, instead of solely bringing content into the app like Flipboard or Facebook’s Paper, they have their media partners build proprietary micro-sites into WeChat with proprietary URLs ie: mp.weixin.qq/majorchinesenetwork and charge users subscription fees.

They’ve also ventured into streaming video, launching a standalone TV with CNTV (major Chinese tv network).

If you think that’s all, they are also China’s small business e/m-commerce solution (like Etsy or even Amazon).
Small business accounts are

  • free to create — fee is dependent on level of API customization and how much a business wants to integrate their products and services into WeChat
  • transactions are conducted inside WeChat — which leads to increased time spent inside app
  • bar-code scanner capabilities so people can scan a bar code in a store of something they see and shop for it online for example
  • built in loyalty cards and point card systems

Major brands and retailers to even a college student with a fruit stand can buy and sell on WeChat – that’s how simple it is.

WeChat states they have 300mm active users per month and YoY growth of 124% (note: these numbers are before the Red Envelope campaign that reportedly activated 20mm transactions within 9 days and announcement of all their partnerships).

WeChat is not fucking around.

I’m sure there are so many more features and functions, products and services I may be missing. This is information I gathered through English sources (FT, Economist, WSJ, Techcrunch, The Next Web, Tech in Asia and some random Chinese sites I ran through Google Translate) but even if I don’t know all the details, it’s pretty clear they are one step above the rest of the chat app herd.

One can argue their success is due to the uniqueness of the Chinese market and how the economy is intertwined by a select few and with the government, but strip away all that noise and look at WeChat as a product. They are still several steps ahead of the rest — even LINE, that I am a massive fan of.

2014 is going to be a year to closely watch Asia.

Scale of Chat Apps in Asia

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I don’t think America still understands how big chat apps are in Asia and that’s ok. Like I keep saying, the US is email, iPhone (iMessage), SMS and Facebook Messenger reliant.

In Asia, it costs money to SMS. It costs money to make phone calls. Not as much as Europe maybe, but it still adds up. The US may be the only country where SMS and voice are flat fee, unlimited.

Because we are charged by telecos, chat apps have become a solution to avoid fees for something basic and ubiquitous as communication.

In Asia we are so chat app reliant, my personal and even work emails have been reduced by at least 85%. The only people who actually email are my American friends and colleagues.

Because I stopped relying on email as my main form of communication, I now see what a massive burden email is and how much of my time email dictated.

Chat apps don’t restrict texts with character counts, but because of the context of the core products (real-time interactions, short mail, instant messaging like features and functions), it cuts out a lot of unnecessary bullshit and people just get straight down to the point.

Granted, this is only from my experience and doing business with the Japanese, but I much prefer interacting with colleagues on LINE or company approved Viber as we communicate more efficiently. (Quick contextual background: the Japanese language has four different ways of speech, two honorifics. The honorifics require buffer language — a lot of set phrases before getting to the point. Chat apps tend to cut all that out.)

Aside from the communication utility, chat apps in Asia are evolving from tools to full fledged platforms. I keep repeating this but it’s almost necessary, as there are people still comparing WhatsApp, Viber, Telegram and Snapchat to LINE, WeChat and KakaoTalk. WhatsApp, Viber, Telegram and Snapchat are used for communication only. With LINE, WeChat and KakaoTalk  usres can text, call, video chat, edit photos, play games, get coupons/discounts… and now WeChat allows their users to shop. In their app. Asian chat apps are more than chat apps, they are turning into ecosystems.

The Asia chat app market is truly something else but I think one has to live in China, Korea or Japan to experience the phenomenon for themselves. At least for me that was the case. In a mere six months chat apps have completely changed the way I communicate and also purchase via mobile.

God, I love technology and I love being in Asia seeing, breathing and living the evolving products and market.

Messaging Apps are Communication Tools

Finally – I get it now. And by it, I mean the WhatsApp acquisition by Facebook.

It’s what I’ve been preaching — that messaging apps are not social networks. They are communication tools / utilities.

So basically, Facebook just bought a telephone company.

But I’m still wondering what is going to happen when messaging apps fully evolve to multi-faceted platforms (gaming, commerce, communication tools); basically the ‘what’s next‘. WhatsApp is going to be left behind.

Only time will tell. I guess.

 

Tencent is offering 10 Terabytes of Storage to Users

Jesus.

Tencent, the parent company to Weibo (China’s largest chat app),  is offering 10 terabytes of storage to their users. That sounds incredible! Amazing! Wondrous!

But I can’t even picture how much 10 terabytes really is…

So of course, I Googled and found some handy pictorial on Neatorama from like, 2008. They charted how much 12 terabytes is worth, which is close enough… I guess.

Behold. This, is 12 terabytes:

It’s nice to visualize, but it’s still hard to really picture (or maybe I’m just stupid?) and upon even further Googling, I came across more examples.

10 terabytes = 1,000 copies of the Encyclopedia Britannica. 300 hours of good quality video. All of the Library of Congress.
Library of Congress = ‘155.3 million items on approximately 838 miles of bookshelves. 35 million books and other print materials, 3.4 million recordings, 13.6 millioni photographs, 5.4 million maps, 6.5 million pieces of sheet music and 68 million manuscripts.

Um. What? 838 miles, is approximately the distance from NYC to Disney World. A little more than San Francisco to Vancouver — CANADA. From Mongolia to Kazakhstan (Borat) and it’s like climbing The Great Smokey Mountains. Either which way, that is a lot of frickin’ stuff on a lot of frickin’ mileage. It’s still a bit unclear to me how much 10 terabytes really is and how it makes my life easier.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t LOTS OF STORAGE! a bit backwards…? I mean… in the age of streaming, why would I even want to store all that data? Googling is so much faster and easier. I can find movies and songs, TV shows, reference books, dictionaries, thesauruses… what would I even do with all that storage space?

Maybe my digital habits are bit different because I long ago stopped being an Internet pack rat — I’m all about constantly organizing and discarding.

I’d rather have less storage room with more bandwidth to upload. The CAPd data message: “File upload failed, file too large.” always bums me out.

Any which way, looking forward to seeing how Tencent does.

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4

Why People Should Care About Viki

My Twitter and Facebook are filled with mostly Americans and Europeans. Americans, only talk about American news (maybe a few China this-and China-that when the FT headlines them). Europeans, are 90% US and a few domestic posts here and there too.

I kind of get the feeling no one really talks about Asia and well, that’s ok. I guess that’s why there is a need on the planet for people like me. I digress, where was I? Oh. Viki. Particularly,Viki and Baidu’s partnership.

This is a BIG DEAL and All Things D nails why:

“Viki, which has already done several partnership deals in China, will be Baidu’s first streaming partner from outside the country, which is important given that big players like Netflix and Google’s YouTube are not represented there.”

Just a reminder, Asia has the largest distribution of world wide Internet audience:

global market

So for Viki, to secure a partnership where YouTube, Netflix, et al., aren’t is certainly a big, big, BIG deal.

I’m just sorry more people, well, don’t really give a two shits.
*FT’s coverage is pretty legit too

Messaging Apps: What’s Next

Several have asked “what’s next?” after this post on messaging apps was published. By what’s next, I’m assuming people are wondering what I see as the ‘next big thing’. There are several ‘what’s next’ questions that need answering. Here is one. Who will win the messaging space?

I went into details about Line in particular because they are taking the right steps in differentiating themselves from the other messaging apps.

  1. product evolution — Line, continues building new features and functions that fit user needs. Most recently they released an event app Band, that is like Facebook events but a million times better.
  2. business models — like I said, stickers are not after-thoughts or novelty items. Stickers, are part of their monetization strategy. Line also does merchandising. They license their characters and collaborate with brand partners to bring things like thisbnr_crocs
    Aside from Crocs they partner with toy makers, accessories makers — basically about any company — to bring stuffed animals, plushies, cell phone accessories, and of course, stickers. [1, 2, 3] They recently collaborated with Maybelline to even bring Thailand users flash sales. Their next step, is eCommerce. Obviously.

Because of the above, I believe LINE will be the ultimate of messaging apps. And I still stand by my statement they will not successfully localize in the US. Messaging apps don’t have a place there.

As for the the Snapchat counter-argument, I am pasting a response to a comment.

I commend Snapchat and indeed their rise proves there is a need but if you look at the feature differences, you, too, will agree Snapchat is not on the same playing field as Line, KakaoTalk and WeChat. WhatsApp, Kik and Viber aren’t even on their levels.

Snapchat serves as a fun tool. WhatsApp, Kik and Viber are communication utilities like Line, KakaoTalk and WeChat. The differences are, the latter three have business models and strategies. Where the former are just…building to build.

In the American market, Instagram (if they lay out their product pipeline correctly and ultimately include text communication sans comment thread) will ultimately win the space (in the US).

As for ‘what’s next’, as in what is the next big thing?  Easy: wearables.

I think it’s absolutely fascinating though, how the US is moving back into hardware, while the software shift is happening around Asia. God, I love technology.

Added. Wired agrees wearables are what’s going to be hot, too.

KakaoTalk’s Challenges

While the US is still trying to figure out how to jump on the messaging app money train, the downfall of messaging apps has begun in Asia.

KakaoTalk is Korea’s most dominant messaging app and an interesting analysis was just released [source].
A few takeaways:

  • KakaoTalk has 130 million subscribers. 35 million of them are from Korea.
  • Korea has approximately 37 million smartphone users
  • Kakao Japan was set up in July 2011. They have a joint venture with Yahoo Japan
  • Kakao is also in Vietnam and Indonesia
  • 9 of their games have at least 100 million cumulative downloads
  • since July of 2013, they have not hit 100 million
  • new subscriber acquisition rate is slowing down
  • they are also losing ground in overseas markets

KakaoTalk’s monetization strategy is lacking and heavy reliance on mobile gaming is a bad idea. Just look at Gree, the Japanese mobile gaming company. Their net profit Q1 fell 74% from the previous year and it keeps declining [source]. Even if KakaoTalk boasts game revenues of $300 million in the first half of the year [source], KakaoTalk’s user acquisition rate is declining. Their games are no longer as popular. They will see a shortage in projected revenue unless they come up with a new plan.

Their localization strategy is a failure. A joint venture with Yahoo! Japan should have catapulted them to mass penetration quickly, for in Japan, Yahoo!  is still the most visited website source. But they are still very much behind LINE, that entered the Japanese market 15 months after KakaoTalk. I also wonder how KakaoTalk is approaching growth in Vietnam and Indonesia.

KakaoTalk will stay dominant in S. Korea, since they have the most users in their home base, but LINE is also owned by Naver. Naver is a S. Korean company and they also have home base advantage. Unless KakaoTalk figures out a way to scale the servers (they are experiencing server errors and outages. Five that I could find, to date. 1,2 ), users can quickly move to another service as fast as they onboarded. Especially, since messaging apps are the way we communicate in Asia. An outage on KakaoTalk or LINE  in the US, is like Gmail or iMessage going down.

The messaging app space is peaking and it’s so competitive right now. It’ll be interesting to keep a close watch on KakaoTalk to see how they will evolve their product and strategies to stay a major player.

Quantitative vs Qualitative

I once heard a story of how the head of Morgan Stanley’s Emerging Markets spends time on the ground, for months, before drawing conclusions and making moves.

I am not head of emerging markets anywhere nor am I an analyst. I am a technologist.

I started out as a product manager in a Fortune 100 B2B enterprise software corporation. My role was to mobilize their main product. I then continued to find places within the intersection of product, Internet, users and content that aligns with business objects, and fell into marketing and content strategy. I’ve lived through one of, if not, the best, times in technology — experiencing the shift of hardware to software, software to web based apps then to mobile apps. I saw the disruption of music, telecom, hardware and electronic industries. I lived it. Breathed it. Worked in it — and still do. There is nothing I am more in touch with, than technology (even myself).

So yes, my posts are mainly qualitative observations. I depend on multiple analyses and news pieces, blogs and tech blogs, and even Twitter, to stay on top of hot topics.

Right now, there is a lot of focus on Asia.

As someone on the ground in Asia and knows the US market, I hope to bring cultural truths which supports numbers from people who get paid to conduct quantitative analyses.

I love technology. I also have a lot to say; too much sometimes, as I am living in one of the most exciting markets in 2013: Asia.

This blog, is the outlet I dump my thoughts. I hope you enjoy reading these posts as much as I love writing them.

Scale of Mobile in Japan is Insane

The WSJ recently announced that Japan has now bypassed the US market in mobile app spending by 10%[1].

Japan has a population of 127 million people.
The US has a population of 314 million people.

Of the 127 million people in Japan, only 51,050,000 million people are smartphone users[2].
Of the 314 million people in the US, there are 143.3 million people who are smartphone users [3].

The American and Japanese markets are very different, so this isn’t a comparison. Just putting into perspective how the Japanese market is rapidly shifting, and how unbelievable the scale is.

 

Japan, Japanese People and Sex

Ok. This is the first and last time I will address this.

Many people are asking about the Guardian article depicting Japan as some weird country with all these bizarre personality problems and sexual issues.

There are many strange things about Japan. Things that make zero sense. Sometimes, the weirdness is just so off the weirdness Richter scale, I don’t blame the world for thinking we are freaks. But look, there are freaks all over the planet. Japanese freaks are simply more visible.

Humans of Earth are so curious about Japan’s weirdness, naturally, our freaky sub-cultures are exposed, mocked and often misunderstood. That’s it. We’re no weirder than any other country. I promise.

Bottomline, Joshua Keating of Slate said it best (backed by a bunch of stats) in his post ‘No, Japanese People Have Not Given Up on Sex’:

 A number of Eastern European countries have lower fertility rates than Japan, but we don’t often see articles portraying Czechs and Poles as sexless nerds.

via here

So don’t worry! Japanese people have not given up on sex!
The End.

*if you’re interested in the original Guardian piece, it’s here